HISTORY 

                      

                                                                                                                          
 GRADUATE OR PROFESSIONAL SCHOOL 
      



GENERAL INFORMATION ABOUT
GRADUATE HISTORY MAJORS 

                                       

                 
   Number of History PhDs Inches Upwards

      by Robert B. Townsend  
      From the News column of the January 2004 Perspectives
 
 

   The number of new history PhDs inched upward slightly, rising from 1,024 in the 2000-01
   academic year to 1,030 in 2001-02. While modest, this reverses a brief decline and marks
   the second-highest number of new history PhDs since 1976.
       
The National Opinion Research Center (NORC) also reports further improvement in
   the hiring of new history PhDs. The report contains another positive sign, as the number
   of new history PhDs with "definite employment" when they received their degree rose by
   2.5 percent to just under 53 percent of the new PhDs. This marks an increase of 18
   percent from the low point reached in 1998-99.

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   Demographics of the 2002 PhD Cohort
by Robert B. Townsend  
      From the News column of the January 2004 Perspectives
 
 

   The time spent working toward the degree dipped slightly, from an average of 9.3 years
   registered for graduate courses to 9 years. However, the average number of years since
   the baccalaureate degree actually increased a bit, to 11.8 years after completing the
   baccalaureate degree. The average age of new history PhDs showed little change, with a
   median age of 34.7 years. 
        The age and years since the bachelor's degree are actually lower than the average for
   PhDs in non-science fields, where the median time since the baccalaureate degree was 14
   years, and the
   median age was 38.3. However, those figures are skewed significantly higher by PhDs in
   education, where the PhD is a vital credential for advancement after years in the classroom. 
        History continues to set the pace for the longest time spent registered for classes,
   though English and American languages increased to the same nine-year pace. But these
   are the only fields where new PhDs are taking so long to get their degrees.
        Other data on the demographics of the new PhD cohort marked some significant
   changes. The proportion of women among the new cohort of history PhDs fell for just the
   third time in the past 10 years, from 40.3 percent to 40 percent of the new degree
   recipients. At the same time, the recent advantage women seemingly enjoyed on the job
   market was erased. Over the past decade women were 5 to 10 percent more likely to
   report definite employment when they received their degrees, and the difference on the
   numbers still seeking employment was even higher. However, in 2002 the gap between
   men and women on both questions disappeared. It is clearly too early to tell what this
   might indicate for the changing dynamics of the job market for history PhDs.



  

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BOOK FOR GRADUATE STUDENTS IN HISTORY

  

   Becoming a Historian: A Survival Manual?2003 Edition
   Melanie S. Gustafson

    "For those just entering the historical work force, this revised and updated edition of
    Gustafson's popular guide provides the necessary practical information about the
    profession, revealing some of the "unwritten" rules and containing invaluable advice
    on the specifics of graduate school, the job search, and various professional dilemmas." 
         2003. 97 pages. ISBN 0-87229-117-0
         $6 members of the American Historical Association; $8 nonmembers  




 

GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS IN HISTORY 
 
                                                                                                

             HISTORY DOCTORAL PROGRAMS IN THE UNITED STATES             

  "This new resource offers a profile of History Doctoral Programs in the U.S.history doctoral   
  progams in the U.S., advice for applicants to PhD 
  programs, and searchable databases on dissertations
  in progress and completed in those programs." This
  is an impressive website and should be of great value
  to those thinking of earning a Ph.D. in history.

 

                               HISTORY DEPARTMENTS AROUND THE WORLD      

  
  The Center for History and New Media at George Mason University offers a
    comprehensive and searchable database of almost 1,200 History Departments   
    around the World. The database is an excellent resource if you are looking for
    the email addresses of other historians. Many department Web pages also
    include detailed biographical information on their entire faculty as well as
    information on their programs and requirements.
   
  

    
                                                                                 

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CAREER OPPORTUNITIES WITH A
GRADUATE DEGREE IN HISTORY

                                                                                 

                   PROPORTION OF UNDERGRADUATES WHO ARE HISTORY MAJORS      

      
 

 


 

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 A GRADUATE DEGREE IN AN
AREA OTHER THAN HISTORY

 

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   http://bls.gov/oco/ocos065.htm  


   


 
                                                                                 

                                              ARCHIVISTS AND CURATORS      

   Employment as an archivist, conservator, or curator usually requires graduate education and
   related work experience. A graduate degree in history or library science, with courses in
   archival science, is preferred by most employers. While completing their formal education,
   many archivists and curators work in archives or museums to gain the hands-on experience
   that many employers seek. Keen competition is expected for the most desirable job openings,
   which generally attract a large number of applicants. 
                    See the 2004-2005 Occupational Outlook Handbook

 

 

   TEACHING SECONDARY HISTORY WITH A GRADUATE DEGREE IN HISTORY      

    Ron Briley, assistant headmaster and history teacher at Sandia Preparatory
    School   in Albuquerque, New Mexico, makes a strong case that, even for
    someone with a graduate degree in history, teaching history at the secondary
    school level is 
AN OPTION WORTH PURSUING
 

 

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                                                                           WRITERS AND EDITORS   
    Most jobs in this occupation require a college degree in communications,
    journalism, 
or English, although a degree in a technical subject may be
    useful for technical-writing positions.

    The outlook for most writing and editing jobs is expected to be competitive,
    because many people with writing or journalism training are attracted to
    the occupation.

    Online publications and services are growing in number and sophistication,
    spurring the demand for writers and editors, especially those with Web
    experience.

    Communicating through the written word, writers and editors generally fall
    into one of three categories. Writers and authors develop original fiction
    and nonfiction for books, magazines, trade journals, online publications,
    company newsletters, radio and television broadcasts, motion pictures,
    and advertisements. (
Reporters and correspondents who collect and
    analyze facts about newsworthy events are described elsewhere in the
    Handbook.) Editors examine proposals and select material for publication
    or broadcast. They review and revise a writer's work for publication or
    dissemination. Technical writers develop technical materials, such as
    equipment manuals, appendices, or operating and maintenance instructions.
    They also may assist in layout work. 

    From the 2004-2005 Occupational Outlook Handbook

                                                   

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  Caareer Information for HISTORY MAJORS


CAREER INFORMATION FOR HISTORY MAJORS
www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/career.html#k12   

     

     

      HISTORIAN   
  

    Historians research, analyze, and interpret the past. They use many sources of
    additional information in their research, including government and institutional
    records, newspapers and other periodicals, photographs, interviews, films, and
    unpublished manuscripts such as personal diaries and letters. Historians usually
    specialize in a country or region, a particular period, or a particular field, such
    as social, intellectual, cultural, political, or diplomatic history. Biographers collect
    detailed information on individuals. Other historians help study and preserve 
    archival materials, artifacts, and historic buildings and sites.

    Historians can expect slower-than-average growth because they enjoy fewer opportunities
    outside of government and academic settings with competition for jobs remaining keen. .

  

    From the OCCUPATIONAL OUTLOOK HANDBOOK


 

 

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 Career Information for HISTORY MAJORS


  
  CAREERS FOR GRADUATE HISTORY MAJORS gives a detailed answer to the question: 
What can you do with an graduate degree in history?

   WHAT CAN YOU DO WITH AN UNDERGRADUATE DEGREE IN HISTORY
http://www.historians.org/pubs/Free/careers/Index.htm

CAREER INFORMATION FOR HISTORY MAJORS
www.library.csi.cuny.edu/dept/history/career.html#k12   

CAREERS FOR STUDENTS OF HISTORY
http://www.historians.org/pubs/careers/index.htm

 

 

                                       CAREER AS A LAWYER   
   The History major is a traditional avenue into the law, government service, and
    teaching. The skills of critical reading and thinking are valuable assets, and law
    schools recognize it. It is not necessary to be a "pre-law" major. A diverse and
    critical education provides skills and understandings that early specialization cannot.    
         From the
NORTH CAROLINA STATE UNIVERSITY DEPARTMENT OF HISTORY.

 

                    TEACHING HISTORY AND THE COLLEGE LEVEL   
  

    The American Historical Association covers CAREERS IN THE CLASSROOM   
    from primary and secondary education to graduate universities giving an  
    overview of the field, indicating the scope of training required, types of
    jobs, and recent  trends in the job market. 

                                                                         LIBRARIAN   
  
  A master's degree in library science usually is required; special librarians often need an
    additional graduate or professional degree. A large number of retirements in the next
    decade is expected to result in many job openings for librarians to replace those who
    leave. Librarians increasingly use information technology to perform research, classify
    materials, and help students and library patrons seek information.

 
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